Monday, December 10, 2012

Seville Orange Marmalade


Orange marmalade is one of the easiest jam-like treats to make if you have seville oranges.   These rather ugly oranges are not grown in the U.S. and are rarely used for anything other than the making of marmalade even in the Mediterranean areas where they are grown.  But for the very best marmalade one must have them.  Harley's Ma Made is the only source I know of and I ordered this can from Amazon.  I think they are also available from Williams-Sonoma. 

You'll need sugar, of course, and a copper jam pot carried out of Budapest after the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 by a dear friend.  If you don't have such a pot, please substitute a heavy, 6 quart sauce pan.  

First, about the pot:  Soon after we moved here (25 years ago), I signed up for a tea class at a local gourmet shop.  Judith G. was the instructor.  We hit it off right away and became good friends.  Judith left Hungary right after the revolution in the mid-1950s.  She eventually ended up in Washington D.C..  She became good friends with Eric Sevareid and his wife, Henry and Nancy Kissinger and Roberta Flack (whom she met in a local bar--interesting since Judith did not drink alcohol so I suppose it was kismet).  She regaled us with stories of her life in Hungary.  Judith spent time as a political prisoner by simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time (from the age of 20 to the age of 24).  She was kept with three other young women.  Since they weren't allowed books, they gave each other "book reviews" of what they had read previous to their imprisonment.  One young woman was a classically trained ballerina.  She taught the others the art of the dance.  Judith's mother had been an opera singer and Judith shared her knowledge of singing.  While they passed those long years together, Judith's parents did not know if she was dead or alive even though she was imprisoned in her home town of Budapest.  Each visit with her was so very interesting and, at times, heartbreaking!  Her husband, Frank, was a landscape architect.  He accepted a position in Chicago to head up five of the large cemeteries as their designer and they moved here from D.C..  My dear friend passed away in December 2002 and I miss her still.  She was a strong and interesting woman.  Both she and her husband were excellent cooks and we shared many meals together.  I learned so much from her!!




The recipe for the marmalade is on the can.



It must be stirred constantly until it comes to a boil.


It's then ready to ladle into pretty jars.


I've never had it fail!



ENJOY!




24 comments:

  1. i enjoyed the story of your friend, what a life she led.

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  2. How beautiful!! I have never heard of these oranges. I guess there are lots more kinds than the ones I know, which are navel, and blood!

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  3. What a sweet thing to make this special jam in the beautiful pot from your lovely friend. What a wonderful reminder of her.

    Whenever we go to Lou Mitchell's for breakfast, my husband and oldest daughter, eat an entire jar of marmalade.

    You have had a busy kitchen, my friend.


    Fondly,
    Glenda

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  4. This is a great story and I can imagine how much you miss your amazing friend. There probably wasn't a boring second when you with her!

    And your marmalade sounds delicious, a must try! I love it on an English muffin.

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  5. what a wonderful marmalade- so sweet and delightful! Really, i just love it and perfect for christmas gifts

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  6. What a story! I was just hearing this morning about a friend's escape from an Eastern European country 30 years ago ... I love the pot!

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  7. What an interesting lady your friend was!!!!!
    Sounds like you have many fond memories!
    The marmalade looks soooo good!!
    xo Kris

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  8. Oh my, I have no doubt the marmalade is truly amazing-enjoy:@)

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  9. A lovely story, lovely marmalade, and a lovely jam pot! :) I'll have to investigate those oranges- hubby loves marmalade.

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  10. Bonnie, I so enjoyed your story. How fortunate for both of you to find one another. I love orange marmalade. Have a wonderful week. Bonnie

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  11. Hi Bonnie! OH, this is beautiful! What a beautiful story! Your orange marmalade looks so good too. You're amazing.
    Hope you're getting all ready for the holidays.
    Be a sweetie,
    Shelia ;)

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  12. This sounds so exotic made with Seville oranges which are so high in pectin and perfect for marmalade. I have it on my list.

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  13. What a touching and wonderful story about your friend... You've brough back memories with yuor Ma Made! I used to make marmalade a lot and my son had it on toast for breakfast every morning! xx
    Have a great Christmas with those you love xx

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  14. Bonnie this is a really nice story, always I wanna make orange marmalade and this look stunning I love the color!!!

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  15. Great story! I love orange marmalade. I've also bought it in Amish country made with rhubarb in it.

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  16. What a wonderful story, Bonnie. I've never made orange marmalade or seen the canned Seville oranges but I'm going to be watching. I'd love to make this!

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  17. How exciting toown a pot that has such history! I'm sure it adds an extra magical taste to your marmelade. It must be a wonderful gift for your friends to receive. It looks delicious!

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  18. Judith sounds like she was an interesting person and that's a beautiful copper pot!

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  19. That is one very interesting story!
    I laughed when you said what kind of pot we would have to cook the marmalade in. Ha! I have seen Ma Made but never looked closely to see what it was.
    Thank you for the recipe. It will make good Christmas gifts.

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  20. The memories help to make your marmalade special. It looks like molten gold and I'd love a spoonful on my morning toast. Have a great day, Bonnie. Blessings...Mary

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  21. I've never made it and I don't know why. I love it. Perhaps it's because my kids never cared for it when they were little. This looks wonderful.

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  22. LOVED your pot's story! How incredible! The marmalade looks yum too. Trying to fly by and catch up with the latest and greatest before my life takes another run in the chaos lane. Hugs from a few miles south!

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  23. As always what a great post; wish I was closer to taste that perfect marmalade.
    Rita

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